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Category Archives for "Applied Sports Psychology"

Behind the Scenes at the Olympics: Sports Psychologists and Positive Psychology
Aug 18

Behind the Scenes at the Olympics: Sports Psychologists and Positive Psychology

By Dr. Jack Singer | Applied Sports Psychology , Blog , Elite Athletes

I am so proud that my emerging field of “Sports Psychology” is always on display during the Olympics, as the US teams each have sport psychologists who specialize in their sport.

Now, I apply the exact same techniques for sales, HR, and Financial Professionals.  The article below was written by psychologist, Rodney L. Lowman.  He says it better than I can.

– Dr. Jack Singer


Guest Post by Psychologist Rodney L. Lowman

They christened themselves the “Final Five” in recognition that they would be the last U.S. gymnast team coached by Martha Karolyi, who will be retiring after the 2016 Summer Olympics after coaching gymnasts through 11 Olympic contests. As the required routines progressed, the U.S. gymnastic team’s scores became nearly insurmountable, winning 12 of 12 routines. The team beat out its closest rival, Russia, by a whopping 8.209 seconds.

Outstanding Olympic Athletes

All of the members of the gymnastics team were superstars delivering dramatic, near-flawless performances, but one, Simone Biles, particularly stood out. She has been dubbed the best gymnast ever but was not born into a life of privilege. Her single mother (now clean and sober) gave up her children due to drug addiction; her father, also an addict, had abandoned the family. Adopted by her maternal grandparents and subsequently raised in Houston, Biles owns more Olympic and world gold medals than any other female gymnast ever. She is 19.

There’s more. The “Final Five” (Simone Biles, Gabby Douglas, Laurie Hernandez, Madison Kocian and Aly Raisman) work together remarkably well as a team. They get along with and support one another, celebrate each other’s victories and console their misses.

Then there are the swimmers Ryan Phelps, age 31, and Michael Lochte, 32, having won to date 25 and 11 Olympic medals, respectively. And let us not overlook Kristin Armstrong, who turned 43 today, and who just made history by winning her third gold medal in timed cycling.

[Tweet “Guess who’s working behind-the-scenes at the #Olympics? #Sports Psychologists!”]

Behind-the-Scenes Champions: Sports Psychologists

We rightly credit the Olympic winners for their victories but behind the scenes are a myriad of coaches, trainers, medical staff, supportive families, and yes—sports psychologists. Little known fact: the U.S. Olympic Committee includes a Sport Psychology Team. It’s now become widely accepted for athletes to have a sports psychologist or performance coach.

Sports psychology is not new. Coleman Griffith worked in the field in the 1920s. Today, sports psychologists use a variety of techniques with athletes: relationship building, arousal regulation, mental imagery, focus-building and goal setting, enhancing self-efficacy and resilience, self-talk and support. Athletes, who face extraordinary stress and high stakes, where fractions of a second determine outcomes, perform better with psychology.

Many contemporary sports psychologists such as Joan Steidinger (running and cyclist), Gio Valiante (golf), and Caroline Silby (running and triathlon) were themselves accomplished athletes. Others, like Steven Bucky, have been counseling NFL athletes for years.

Positive Psychology Can Improve Your Career Too

All of this work reflects a move in psychology to focus on performance and achievement not just deficit and dysfunction. This is often called the positive psychology revolution, whose founders include Donald Clifton and Martin Seligman (“Learned Optimism”)—and those before them like Carl Rogers and Abraham Maslow who concerned themselves with human happiness and well-being.

Salutogenesis – the promotion of health and well-being – is rapidly becoming an important theme in psychological research and Psychology is a remarkably broad field and its premiere professional organization, the APA, and its Division 47, Society for Sport, Exercise and Performance Psychology, reflect that diversity.

Jan 21

Lessons We All Can Learn From Russell Wilson and the Seattle Seahawks!

By Dr. Jack Singer | Applied Sports Psychology

I don’t know Russell Wilson personally, but, in my practice as a Professional Sport Psychologist for the past 33 years, I know a thing or two about what it takes to become a champion, about mental toughness and resilience to adversity, all of which Russell and the Seahawks displayed so beautifully in the NFC Championship game on Sunday.

Like NFL quarterbacks, all athletes have to deal with obstacles, challenges and setbacks. Will they fold under such circumstances, believing that they cannot succeed and wait for the next opportunity to prove themselves?

Or…like Russell Wilson, will they embrace the mindset of a champion, by maintaining supreme confidence in the face of adversity and bounce back from setbacks? Do you have a game plan on the back burner to deal with unforeseen setbacks in your sport? Do you have the confidence and mental toughness to be resilient in the face of adversity?

One important lesson to be learned from Russell Wilson is that we all have choices regarding how to assess a really devastating situation. During the first half of his game against Green Bay, his performance was so poor that he had a zero quarterback rating, and he was playing the worst game of his NFL career. With his team down by a score of 16-0, one choice Russell had was to admit to himself that it wasn’t his or the Seahawks’ day, lose the belief that a victory was possible, and just try to get through the second half without more embarrassment. In other words, play it safe, while expecting to lose.

But neither Russell Wilson nor the Seahawks think that way. Even with only a few minutes left in the game, with his team still trailing by 12 points, he trusted his ability to bring victory to the Seahawks. Mental toughness is the ability to sustain your intensity and bounce back, despite setbacks, adversity, and unexpected obstacles. And that kind of mental toughness paid off.

Mental toughness skills include confidence building, resiliency, and developing an “identity statement” that an athlete can repeat, along with other positive affirmations each day.

An “identity statement” is a realistic reminder (no room for modesty here) of the real qualities you possess as an elite athlete and the vision you have of your future performance. The purpose of such a statement is to enhance your self-esteem and confidence, especially when you begin to doubt yourself.

Here is an example:

“I am intelligent and I know my sport better than anyone on my team. I have the greatest work ethic and I will eventually be an all-star.”

Combining such a statement with relaxing breathing and visualizing past successes builds the mental toughness necessary for bouncing back from setbacks. Certainly Russell Wilson, the Seattle Seahawks and the coaching all practice mental toughness and it really paid off big time in the NFC championship game!

Jan 07

Chip Kelly’s 6 Keys to Run a Great Practice

By Dr. Jack Singer | Applied Sports Psychology

This post is courtesy of Championship Performance. Even though he is talking primarily of sports teams, his points and wisdom also speak to team building no matter what profession you are in.

Dream Big, Set Goals, Take Action

Current Philadelphia Eagle and former Oregon football coach Chip Kelly is recognized as an innovator in his approach to the game. It all starts with the way his teams practice. Here are his 6 keys to run a great practice.

1) Improved Execution by Speed and Repetition. “If your players have not run that (game-deciding play) over a thousand times in practice, you will not have a chance to be successful. My old high school coach told me a long time ago that ‘If your head is moving, your feet are not.’ That means if you are thinking about what you do, you are not doing it as fast,” Kelly said.

To Kelly, practice is for one thing: repetitions. Learning by doing. Teaching and talking takes place in classrooms and video sessions beforehand, whenever possible. Stopping to talk during practice is a wasted opportunity and pulls you away from the rhythm of actual games.

As much as possible, every aspect of practice, emulates the game environment. If you can’t stop a play and instruct your player in a game, don’t do that in practice. Kelly’s assistants only correct players if they are substituted out of the scrimmage. The loud music is designed in part to simulate game conditions, specifically players’ ability to communicate without shouting or hand signals, but also the excitement of the event. It’s an exercise in focus despite distractions.

Kelly’s practices start fast and keep accelerating. His teams typically run 135 plays in each practice and sometimes more than 150. Some players have said that games seem slow in comparison. They ran no wind sprints; the entire practice was a wind sprint in the form of reps.

2) Building Trust. The teaching isn’t just to make players learn new systems. It also builds trust as Kelly takes the time to explain why they do certain things other teams don’t.

A former player noted: “One thing I liked about Coach Kelly is that you can go in and ask him why am I doing this – why am I running this route instead of that route and he will tell you directly – boom, boom. That makes you respect him more and gives you a place where you can voice your opinion. He doesn’t take it as a threat. Everything has a purpose. If it’s not proven, we won’t do it.”

When trying to innovate in a very traditional sport, this type of open communication is crucial and so is lack of defensiveness. It’s not about the coach having to be right, it’s about finding out what works and giving the players a say in what brings them to their best performance level.

3) Developing Leaders. At Oregon, instead of having one or two team captains, they had sixteen – one leader for each position. Kelly let the players choose who those leaders would be because: “Those guys have a better feeling for it. Once we have those sixteen squad leaders, I spend more time with those guys than anybody else. Talking about what being a leader is all about. Be the first one to serve, be the last to be served. Be the first one to indentify what our team standards are and be the last to break them.”

4) Communication. Kelly’s programs have done this both with the players and with assistant coaches. In Philadelphia, plays will not just be called by the head coach and relayed in. Position coaches will be sending signals in to just their players, allowing much more specific and complicated messages and making it impossible for opponents to steal the calls in time to relay them to their players.

5) Changing Bad Habits. It’s crucial in the Kelly system to catch bad habits in practice and break them there. In the pressure and unpredictable flux of a game, players don’t have time to analyze or think about what to do. They will react based on the instincts developed in practice, so bad habits not corrected will emerge at game time.

This has been proven by research into the brain. It turns out that pathways in the brain actually reinforce themselves through use, so the concept of habits is not just a nagging point – it’s burned into the brain through repetition.

6) Daily Super Bowl Mentality. Much of the even keel emotional state that Kelly encourages comes from the idea that “every game is the Super Bowl.” No rival is more important than another. No one is getting caught up in next week’s glory. The focus is always to perform the next play as well as possible. That is the only thing that matters. It’s an attitude that keeps you focused in a game, no matter what the score says. He wants his teams to play with a focused intensity that he calls “fearless and fun.”

Jan 02

One of the Healthiest New Year’s Resolutions You Can Make

By Dr. Jack Singer | Applied Sports Psychology , Stress Management

By Dr. Jack Singer

Resolve to Get More Sleep!

One of The Healthiest New Year’s Resolutions You Can Make by Dr. Jack SingerI have had countless teenage clients over the years who get only 5 or 6 hours of sleep on school nights, primarily because their parents put so much emphasis on their grades and encourage their youngsters to stay up as late as necessary to conduct homework or study.

And… I have had countless adults who developed sleep deprivation during their school years and have continued this habit into adulthood. Some of these people stay up late at night working, but many of them fall victim to the our current technology, which entices us to put off bedtime with computer games, chat rooms or surfing the web.

Why am I discussing this issue in the first place? Because there is now burgeoning research that shows that losing as little as one hour of sleep a night can have serious, long term effects on your health!

A quarter of our teens get no more than six and a half hours of sleep, and their brains and bodies require nine hours. Furthermore, a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health study in 2012 found that 41 million workers get less than five hours of sleep a night, and experts recommend seven to nine hours for working adults.

Health and Risk Consequences of Sleep Deprivation

Driver fatigue results in 100,000 auto crashes annually. That relationship between sleep deprivation and accidents is obvious. But less obvious and more dangerous is the fact that not getting the proper amount of sleep leads to problems metabolizing glucose, insulin resistance, inflammation problems, and it even can negatively affect the immune system.

New research dramatically shows that even cutting sleep by one or two hours a night can lead to obesity, improper glucose metabolism and high blood pressure. In short, insufficient sleep can promote diabetes and chronic blood pressure issues, both of which can cut years off your life and lead to a myriad of additional medical problems. In addition, other studies show that too little sleep negatively affects mood and promotes inflammation, which also underlies many chronic physical disorders.

Developing Sleep Hygiene

Now that we know how widespread and devastating are the effects of cutting hours off your sleep schedule, what can you do to avoid this problem? The good news is that, except for insomniacs, we all have control over how many hours we sleep. It means making a deal with yourself to avoid the late night movie or talk show on tv, avoiding the tempting game on the computer and certainly avoiding caffeine, especially late at night.

You can make this happen!

The effects of sleep deprivation are devastating, but the symptoms are silent for many years, so, like silent blood pressure issues, we tend to ignore the problem.

  • Make a resolution that starting today, you will give yourself permission to get at least eight hours of quality sleep, which is a major preventer of devastating health issues down the road.
  • Set a bedtime routine that is consistent and watch how refreshed you will feel each morning. Most importantly, you will be adding life to your years and certainly years to your life.

Free 20 Minute Telephone Consultation with Psychologist Dr. Jack Singer

About the Author:

Dr. Jack Singer is a professional speaker, trainer and psychologist. He has been speaking for and training Fortune 1000 companies, associations, CEO’s and elite athletes for 34 years.  Among the association conventions which Dr. Jack has keynoted are those which serve financial planners.

Dr. Jack is a frequent guest on CNN, MSNBC, FOX SPORTS and countless radio talk shows across the U.S. and Canada.  He is the author of “The Teacher’s Ultimate Stress Mastery Guide,” and several series of hypnotic audio programs, some specifically for athletes and some for anyone wanting to raise their self-confidence and esteem. To learn more about Dr. Singer’s speaking and consulting services, please visit  DrJackSinger.com and FunSpeaker.com or call him in the U.S. at (800) 497-9880.

Dec 10

Sport Psychology Tip of the Day: Overcoming the Top Barriers to Peak Performance

By Dr. Jack Singer | Applied Sports Psychology , Sport Psychology Tip of the Day

by Jack Singer, Ph.D.
Licensed Sport/Clinical Psychologist

Overcoming the Top Barriers to Peak Performance

[contentbox width=”500″ borderwidth=”1″ borderstyle=”dashed” bordercolor=”000000″ dropshadow=”0″ backgroundcolor=”F5F5F5″ radius=”0″]This is the 6th of a series of cutting edge tips from the field of Sport Psychology to help you reach peak performance, both as an individual athlete and as a team. If you have any questions, please feel free to call Dr. Jack at 1-800-497-9880 or email him on the contact page.[/contentbox]

Overcoming the top barriers to peak performance by Sports Psychologist Dr. Jack Singer

Teaching peak performance skills is the most frequent request I receive as a Sport Psychologist.

Here are 7 key barriers to achieving peak performance and proven methods for overcoming them:

  1. Inability to Get Motivated to Train.  Write down your main performance goals and the exact training regimen necessary to achieve each.  Keep track of your progress in training.
  2. Lack of Confidence. Be aware of the negative self-talk habits you use and learn a method to stop them dead in their tracks. Seek support from teammates to overcome adversity and bounce back from disappointing performances.
  3. Too Much Anxiety During Games. Recognize the worrisome thoughts that lead to worrying before and during your performances.  Learn relaxation techniques, deep breathing and even self-hypnosis to control anxiety. Always focus on the process of performing your sport…not the outcome.  Focusing on winning and the outcome subtracts from your focus on what the process of a winning performance entails.
  4. Too  Many Distractions During Your Performance. A simple formula for success holds true, regardless of your sport: Your Performance=Your Talent + Your Motivation- Distractions. The number one distraction is negative self-talk.  See number 2 above.
  5. Non-Productive Emotions. Anger, fear, worry, lack of enthusiasm, etc. are all emotions that prevent optimal performance. Understand the triggers for those emotions and you can begin to eliminate them.  Look to role models who display the emotions that lead to high performance and emulate them.  Talk to them for inspiration.
  6. Too much intensity.  Ideally, if we measure intensity on a scale from 1-10, try to stay within the 5-6 range.  Too much intensity will lead to early exhaustion.  Not enough intensity will lead to mediocre performance.  Make a plan based on your fitness and strengths and stick to it throughout the game/event.
  7. Disregarding Injuries.  A mistake that many athletes make is not giving their bodies a chance to completely heal from injury before continuing in competition.  The notion of “no pain…no gain” is archaic.  Get diagnosed early and be patient with rehab before returning.  Stop thinking about the time you’re missing, the disappointment in your coach, etc., and instead, focus on your long term plan to become even better once you are completely healed.

Core Sports Performance

You know the importance of training your muscles. But you should also know the importance of training your mind. It’s no secret that elite athletes like Tiger Woods, Ken Norton (who used hypnosis training before his famous victory where he broke Mohammad Ali’s jaw), and Nolan Ryan all used hypnosis to propel them to the next level.

Now, you can acquire these same techniques, and reap the benefits of unconscious peak-performance training.

In just four sessions, Dr. Jack’s unique hypnosis techniques and visualization exercises will help you fully utilize your unconscious mind for peak sports performance. You’ll learn to enlist all facets of your consciousness to help you overcome obstacles. Each session will take you into deeper states of relaxation and focus.

All athletes train hard. But less than 1% know how to apply the techniques you’ll learn from Dr. Jack Singer’s Core Sports Performance program. Hypnosis can make the difference for every athlete who wants to gain a competitive edge. Click here to purchase.

Free 20 Minute Telephone Consultation with Psychologist Dr. Jack Singer

About the Author:

Dr. Jack Singer is a professional speaker, trainer and psychologist. He has been speaking for and training Fortune 1000 companies, associations, CEO’s and elite athletes for 34 years.  Among the association conventions which Dr. Jack has keynoted are those which serve financial planners.

Dr. Jack is a frequent guest on CNN, MSNBC, FOX SPORTS and countless radio talk shows across the U.S. and Canada.  He is the author of “The Teacher’s Ultimate Stress Mastery Guide,” and several series of hypnotic audio programs, some specifically for athletes and some for anyone wanting to raise their self-confidence and esteem. To learn more about Dr. Singer’s speaking and consulting services, please visit  DrJackSinger.com and FunSpeaker.com or call him in the U.S. at (800) 497-9880.

Dec 07

Stress Mastery Rx #1

By Dr. Jack Singer | Applied Sports Psychology , Stress Management , Stress Mastery Rx Series

by Jack Singer, Ph.D.
Consulting Psychologist and Professional Speaker & Trainer

[contentbox width=”500″ borderwidth=”1″ borderstyle=”dashed” bordercolor=”000000″ dropshadow=”0″ backgroundcolor=”F5F5F5″ radius=”0″]This is Stress Mastery Rx #1 in a series of 77 proven personal prescriptions from psychologist Dr. Jack Singer. If you have any questions, please feel free to call Dr. Jack at 1-800-497-9880 or email him on the contact page.[/contentbox]

This is Stress Mastery Rx #1 in a series of 77 proven personal prescriptions from psychologist Dr. Jack Singer. Take care of your emotional health by taking care of your physical health.

Consider visiting a licensed Naturopathic Physician to learn about foods and natural supplements that have been proven to reduce and prevent stress.

The following  are examples of physical features which been shown to directly impact moods and stress levels:

  • Keep your blood sugar low with frequent, smaller meals that include protein
  • Eat light at night
  • Get ample sleep
  • Avoid alcohol, caffeine and tobacco
  • Load up on anti-oxidant foods
  • Keep your weight within the normal range for your age and height

All 77 tips are featured, along with easy-to-learn tools for practicing stress mastery, in Dr. Jack’s nationally acclaimed book, ‘The Teacher’s Ultimate Stress Mastery Guide.’ You don’t have to be a teacher to change your life with this book. Dr. Jack’s tips apply to everyone, in all professions!”

Order the book here, for the limited time discounted price of $31.95

Free 20 Minute Telephone Consultation with Psychologist Dr. Jack Singer

About the Author:

Dr. Jack Singer is a professional speaker, trainer and psychologist. He has been speaking for and training Fortune 1000 companies, associations, CEO’s and elite athletes for 34 years.  Among the association conventions which Dr. Jack has keynoted are those which serve financial planners.

Dr. Jack is a frequent guest on CNN, MSNBC, FOX SPORTS and countless radio talk shows across the U.S. and Canada.  He is the author of “The Teacher’s Ultimate Stress Mastery Guide,” and several series of hypnotic audio programs, some specifically for athletes and some for anyone wanting to raise their self-confidence and esteem. To learn more about Dr. Singer’s speaking and consulting services, please visit  DrJackSinger.com and FunSpeaker.com or call him in the U.S. at (800) 497

Dec 05

Sport Psychology Tip of the Day: Maintaining Team Synergy

By Dr. Jack Singer | Applied Sports Psychology , Elite Athletes

by Jack Singer, Ph.D.
Licensed Sport/Clinical Psychologist

4 Critical Ways to Maintain Team Synergy During a Long Season

[contentbox width=”500″ borderwidth=”1″ borderstyle=”dashed” bordercolor=”000000″ dropshadow=”0″ backgroundcolor=”F5F5F5″ radius=”0″]This is the 5th of a series of cutting edge tips from the field of Sport Psychology to help you reach peak performance, both as an individual athlete and as a team. If you have any questions, please feel free to call Dr. Jack at 1-800-497-9880 or email him on the contact page.[/contentbox]

As a team goes through the trials and tribulations of a difficult season, internal dynamics can have as much to do with the success or failure of the team as does the competition.

Here are 4 tips to give your team a better chance of maintaining their mutual goals and success:

  1. Embrace Diversity.  Team chemistry thrives on team diversity, so that players balance each other out.  Encourage practical jokers, serious-all-the-time players, motivators, leaders, etc. for the best results.  Sort of like politics in the U.S.  We are much better with democrats, republicans and independents, each with different ideas and skill sets.
  2. Place Importance on Positive, Optimistic Feedback. Communicate encouraging, optimistic information to teammates, rather than critical, discouraging information.  Be aware that different players require different kinds of feedback to motivate them, so pay attention to the verbal and non verbal feedback you give each player.
  3. Provide Mutual Support, Regardless of the Situation. Team members who are supportive of their teammates and encouraging, regardless of mistakes made, put the team in the best position to overcome adversity.  The Golden Rule is always treat your teammates like you’d appreciate them treating you, under the same circumstances.
  4. Develop and Maintain Mutual Trust. Teammates need to trust that they are accepted, even on days where their performance is lacking.  They need to know that everyone on the team has their best interests in mind and that the whole will always achieve more than the separate individuals will.  This is particularly important where teammates are competing with each other for starting positions.  Team should be first…not individual goals or desires.  

Core Sports Performance

You know the importance of training your muscles. But you should also know the importance of training your mind. It’s no secret that elite athletes like Tiger Woods, Ken Norton (who used hypnosis training before his famous victory where he broke Mohammad Ali’s jaw), and Nolan Ryan all used hypnosis to propel them to the next level.

Now, you can acquire these same techniques, and reap the benefits of unconscious peak-performance training.

In just four sessions, Dr. Jack’s unique hypnosis techniques and visualization exercises will help you fully utilize your unconscious mind for peak sports performance. You’ll learn to enlist all facets of your consciousness to help you overcome obstacles. Each session will take you into deeper states of relaxation and focus.

All athletes train hard. But less than 1% know how to apply the techniques you’ll learn from Dr. Jack Singer’s Core Sports Performance program. Hypnosis can make the difference for every athlete who wants to gain a competitive edge. Click here to purchase.

Free 20 Minute Telephone Consultation with Psychologist Dr. Jack Singer

About the Author:

Dr. Jack Singer is a professional speaker, trainer and psychologist. He has been speaking for and training Fortune 1000 companies, associations, CEO’s and elite athletes for 34 years.  Among the association conventions which Dr. Jack has keynoted are those which serve financial planners.

Dr. Jack is a frequent guest on CNN, MSNBC, FOX SPORTS and countless radio talk shows across the U.S. and Canada.  He is the author of “The Teacher’s Ultimate Stress Mastery Guide,” and several series of hypnotic audio programs, some specifically for athletes and some for anyone wanting to raise their self-confidence and esteem. To learn more about Dr. Singer’s speaking and consulting services, please visit  DrJackSinger.com and FunSpeaker.com or call him in the U.S. at (800) 497-9880.

Nov 21

Sport Psychology Tip of the Day: Turning Anger Into a Positive Force

By Dr. Jack Singer | Applied Sports Psychology , General

by Jack Singer, Ph.D.
Licensed Sport/Clinical Psychologist

[contentbox width=”500″ borderwidth=”1″ borderstyle=”dashed” bordercolor=”000000″ dropshadow=”0″ backgroundcolor=”F5F5F5″ radius=”0″]This is the third of a series of cutting edge tips from the field of Sport Psychology to help you reach peak performance, both as an individual athlete and as a team. If you have any questions, please feel free to call Dr. Jack at 1-800-497-9880 or email him on the contact page.[/contentbox]

One of the most requested services I receive from athletes of all ages and levels of skill is help controlling their anger.  This is such a common concern, that I developed an Anger Mastery hypnosis series just for this purpose.

Anger is a “normal emotion” and when controlled, can actually serve some very practical purposes, such as becoming an energizer and motivator.  You can channel the strength and energy of your angry emotions into finding a practical solution to the problems that evoked the anger.

Sport Psychology Tip of the Day with Dr. Jack SingerTechniques for Controlling and Mastering Your Anger

  1. Recognize the trigger to your anger.  Is this a recurrent situation that you need to be on the lookout for?
  2. Think of alternative responses to that trigger.  Examples are taking a series of deep breaths through your diaphragm and then giving yourself some positive self talk about how you are happy that you are controlling your reactions.
  3. Rehearse self-talk that you will use in the future, when you are provoked.  For example, “I can control myself and don’t need to react with anger.  I will be very pleased when I react with calmness.”
  4. Take charge of “should” statements.  Stop thinking about what the other player or the ref should or should not have done.
  5. Take responsibility for your angry reactions.  Instead of saying to yourself, “That guy is making me angry,” change it to “I don’t have to allow myself to feel angry when he does that.”  This gives you a feeling of control, which will lessen the probability of you reacting with anger.
  6. Discuss the triggers that provoke you with someone you trust, such as a teammate, roommate, girlfriend or counselor.  The act of discussing it my help you ultimately to let the steam out of your system and gain control.

 

Free 20 Minute Telephone Consultation with Psychologist Dr. Jack Singer

About the Author:

Dr. Jack Singer is a professional speaker, trainer and psychologist. He has been speaking for and training Fortune 1000 companies, associations, CEO’s and elite athletes for 34 years.  Among the association conventions which Dr. Jack has keynoted are those which serve financial planners.

Dr. Jack is a frequent guest on CNN, MSNBC, FOX SPORTS and countless radio talk shows across the U.S. and Canada.  He is the author of “The Teacher’s Ultimate Stress Mastery Guide,” and several series of hypnotic audio programs, some specifically for athletes and some for anyone wanting to raise their self-confidence and esteem. To learn more about Dr. Singer’s speaking and consulting services, please visit  DrJackSinger.com and FunSpeaker.com or call him in the U.S. at (800) 497-9880.

Nov 14

Sport Psychology Tip of the Day: Checklist for Productive Practices

By Dr. Jack Singer | Applied Sports Psychology

by Jack Singer, Ph.D.
Licensed Sport/Clinical Psychologist

[contentbox width=”500″ borderwidth=”1″ borderstyle=”dashed” bordercolor=”000000″ dropshadow=”0″ backgroundcolor=”F5F5F5″ radius=”0″]This is the second of a series of cutting edge tips from the field of Sport Psychology to help you reach peak performance, both as an individual athlete and as a team. If you have any questions, please feel free to call Dr. Jack at 1-800-497-9880 or email him on the contact page.[/contentbox]

Coaches frequently complain that practices are not consistently productive and research shows that the more practices simulate game conditions, the better athletes and teams perform during games.  Therefore, having consistently productive practices is crucial to team success.

Sport Psychology Tip of the Day: Checklist for Productive PracticesA very thorough checklist for Practice Organization was highlighted in a recent edition of Championship Performance: 

  1. Is the practice schedule for the day displayed on the team bulletin board?
  2. Do the players arrive on time for practice?
  3. Does the coach have a file of previous practices?
  4. Does the coach have a written practice plan?
  5. Does the coach refer back to past practice plans?
  6. Do the plans list specific time limits for each activity?
  7. Does the coach have specific duties planned for each activity?
  8. Do the players know what is expected of them in each practice?
  9. Does each member of the coaching staff have clearly defined responsibilities?
  10. Does the coach have different plans for the separate parts of the season?
  11. Do the players gain or lose stamina and endurance during practice?
  12. Do the players run drills directly related to anticipated game situations?
  13. Can the players raise their intensity levels during practice to the levels they will need in the game?

Structure and organization during practices are key ingredients for success during game time.

Check out Dr. Jack’s Instant Sports Success ebook series, How to Maintain Peak Performance & The Winner’s Mental Edge.

Free 20 Minute Telephone Consultation with Psychologist Dr. Jack Singer

About the Author:

Dr. Jack Singer is a professional speaker, trainer and psychologist. He has been speaking for and training Fortune 1000 companies, associations, CEO’s and elite athletes for 34 years.  Among the association conventions which Dr. Jack has keynoted are those which serve financial planners.

Dr. Jack is a frequent guest on CNN, MSNBC, FOX SPORTS and countless radio talk shows across the U.S. and Canada.  He is the author of “The Teacher’s Ultimate Stress Mastery Guide,” and several series of hypnotic audio programs, some specifically for athletes and some for anyone wanting to raise their self-confidence and esteem. To learn more about Dr. Singer’s speaking and consulting services, please visit  DrJackSinger.com and FunSpeaker.com or call him in the U.S. at (800) 497-9880.

Nov 07

Sport Psychology Tip of the Day: Team Building Exercise

By Dr. Jack Singer | Applied Sports Psychology

by Jack Singer, Ph.D.
Licensed Sport/Clinical Psychologist

[contentbox width=”500″ borderwidth=”1″ borderstyle=”dashed” bordercolor=”000000″ dropshadow=”0″ backgroundcolor=”F5F5F5″ radius=”0″]This is the first of a series of cutting edge tips from the field of Sport Psychology to help you reach peak performance, both as an individual athlete and as a team. If you have any questions, please feel free to call Dr. Jack at 1-800-497-9880 or email him on the contact page.[/contentbox]

Sport Psychology Tip of the Day - Team BuildingOne of the most positive and pro-active things a team can do is anticipate situations that could erode team chemistry. By putting possible conflicts, etc., on the table and practicing alternative reactions will go a long way toward preventing such erosion and will keep the team functioning as a well-oiled machine.

Developing Practice Scenarios:

Solicit from athletes (anonymously if possible) situations that could cause frustration and friction on the team and which they might have a tendency to react negatively. Example: A basketball team where two hot shot freshmen were recruited and now some junior or senior starters are concerned that they will lose their spot.

Exercise:

Split the team in half and have each group role play a scenario in front of the rest of the team. Example: Give the players the scenario above, as if it has happened already to their team. Have the group act out a negative response, followed by a positive response. Done correctly, this exercise will be fun and creative solutions will flow.

  • Negative responses may include players complaining that “They didn’t earn their way into the starting lineup,” or “Coach must be mad at me and is starting him to motivate me.”
  • Positive responses my include: “We welcome the opportunity to compete against younger players in practice. If they outplay us, they deserve to start and our team will be better for it.” “Even if I lose my starting job, I can become a mentor to the freshmen and our team will be better for it.”

Allowing team members to come up with sample scenarios and then role play unhealthy reactions, followed by healthy reactions can go a long way toward building resilience to the inevitable frustrations they will face down the road.

You know the importance of training your muscles. But you should also know the importance of training your mind. It’s no secret that elite athletes like Tiger Woods, Ken Norton (who used hypnosis training before his famous victory where he broke Mohammad Ali’s jaw), and Nolan Ryan all used hypnosis to propel them to the next level. Check out Dr. Jack’s Core Sports Performance 2 CD set.

Free 20 Minute Telephone Consultation with Psychologist Dr. Jack Singer

About the Author:

Dr. Jack Singer is a professional speaker, trainer and psychologist. He has been speaking for and training Fortune 1000 companies, associations, CEO’s and elite athletes for 34 years.  Among the association conventions which Dr. Jack has keynoted are those which serve financial planners.

Dr. Jack is a frequent guest on CNN, MSNBC, FOX SPORTS and countless radio talk shows across the U.S. and Canada.  He is the author of “The Teacher’s Ultimate Stress Mastery Guide,” and several series of hypnotic audio programs, some specifically for athletes and some for anyone wanting to raise their self-confidence and esteem. To learn more about Dr. Singer’s speaking and consulting services, please visit  DrJackSinger.com and FunSpeaker.com or call him in the U.S. at (800) 497-9880.

Oct 31

The Elusive “Mental Toughness” Ability

By Dr. Jack Singer | Applied Sports Psychology , Elite Athletes , General

by Dr. Jack Singer
Licensed Sport Psychologist

The Elusive Mental Toughness Ability by Dr. Jack Singer, Licensed Sport PsychologistCoaches, players, parents and the like are always asking me how to help their athletes become more “mentally tough.”

Is this an inherited trait, or a learned ability?

The answer is that “Mental Toughness” is definitely an ability that can be developed through repetitive training of some relatively simple skills.

The 4 C’s of Mental Toughness:

  • Control
  • Commitment
  • Challenge
  • Confidence

Mental toughness involves teaching athletes how to take Control of their performance (rather than feeling they have little control over it), maintaining a Commitment to their goals, embrace the Challenge of performing their best, and feel the Confidence that they can perform their best when it matters the most. Of course, there are many ways of teaching these skills, but the one I prefer involves the following 5 steps:

  1. Take a deep Centering Breath, breathing in through your nose to the count of 4, holding it for 4 and exhaling completely out of your mouth to the count of 7.
  2. Repeat a statement to yourself that focuses you on what it takes to be a success at your sport. Repeat it several times. For example, a baseball player can say to himself, “relax, breath, track the ball, smooth swing.”
  3. Visualize your best performance ever and imagine yourself repeating that performance again, taking in everything you see, hear, feel, etc. from the original performance.
  4. Repeat your personal Identity Statement, which boosts your self-confidence. Remind yourself of your greatest athletic strength and project it into the future as if you are already an all star performer, for example.
  5. Repeat the Centering Breath.

This Mental Toughness routine can be learned by any athlete and it takes only a few minutes to repeat each day and before your competition. If you are consistent, this simple routine will lead you to the winner’s edge!

Free 20 Minute Telephone Consultation with Psychologist Dr. Jack Singer

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About the Author:

Dr. Jack Singer is a professional speaker, trainer and psychologist. He has been speaking for and training Fortune 1000 companies, associations, CEO’s and elite athletes for 34 years.  Among the association conventions which Dr. Jack has keynoted are those which serve financial planners.

Dr. Jack is a frequent guest on CNN, MSNBC, FOX SPORTS and countless radio talk shows across the U.S. and Canada.  He is the author of “The Teacher’s Ultimate Stress Mastery Guide,” and several series of hypnotic audio programs, some specifically for athletes and some for anyone wanting to raise their self-confidence and esteem. To learn more about Dr. Singer’s speaking and consulting services, please visit  DrJackSinger.com and FunSpeaker.com or call him in the U.S. at (949) 497-9880.

Oct 05

Dr. Jack Singer’s Anger Mastery Series [Medical Hypnosis]

By Dr. Jack Singer | Applied Sports Psychology , Blog , Medical Hypnosis

Dr. Jack Singer’s Anger Mastery Series

Anger Mastery by Dr. Jack SingerJack Singer, Ph.D., nationally-renowned Clinical and Sport Psychologist, Professional Speaker and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist, has spent the last 20 plus years working with clients who have experienced issues with anger.

This Anger Mastery series is based on state of the art research in Anger Management, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, and Clinical Hypnotherapy.

In this exclusive-download program, you will learn easy-to-master skills that you can put to use right away.

This program will help you to ward-off frustration and anger-producing triggers and live with complete control of your emotions.

Learn what sets you off and how to control your reactions by clicking here for instant download on the Hypnosis Network.

 

Medical Hypnosis: The Answer You’ve Been Looking For

Through simple, hypnotic techniques, you will learn powerful skills, including how to:

  • Eliminate distorted thinking patterns that form your angry emotions
  • React with clarity and calmness to life’s every day frustrations
  • Use “Anger Inoculation” to desensitize you to those anger-producing provocations
  • Employ positive affirmations to help you ward off anger-producing provocations
  • Master your anger and frustration, regardless of the situation in which you find yourself
  • Use powerful Self-Hypnosis to master your anger and frustration whenever you feel the need

You can also still find my 3 sports programs, Core Sports Performance, Accelerated Sports Healing, and Advanced Sports Pain Management as well.  Click here.

Added Bonus

From now until Tuesday, Oct 9th, use coupon code FALL2012 when you checkout to get 20% off any available program.”

Free 20 Minute Telephone Consultation with Psychologist Dr. Jack Singer

Sep 13

Coaching by Intimidation Does NOT Work

By Dr. Jack Singer | Applied Sports Psychology , Children and Family , Elite Athletes

To all parents of athletes who have to deal with arrogant, hostile, insulting coaches:

Coaches bullying kidsDuring my 33 years as a Professional Sport Psychologist, I have been disheartened by the volume of young athletes who describe coaches that “coach” by intimidation, threats and humiliation.  While I understand that many of these coaches are successful, what the coaches don’t seem to understand is that their success is a result of motivated young athletes who will tolerate these methods, rather than the method itself being the reason for the success.”

Every year, so many parents bring youngsters to me who are stellar, gifted athletes, but they want to quit their sport.  Afraid to say it’s because of the coach’s methods, for fear of looking weak, they come up with mysterious injuries and a whole host of reasons to describe why they no longer have the passion for the sport.

Most coaches don’t conduct exit interviews to determine why their charges quit, or switch coaches; instead, they write them off as wimps who couldn’t take the pressure.  Moreover, many parents get upset with their youngsters after all of the years of sacrifice and expense.

Now a well researched article documenting the plight of  youngsters who are “forced” to tolerate such coaches and parental pressure to continue, has been published.  Stay tuned for my summary of that article.  As a parent, or a coach, these findings will be eye opening!”

Free 20 Minute Telephone Consultation with Psychologist Dr. Jack Singer


Jul 05

Sports Psychologists now working with the Olympic teams

By Dr. Jack Singer | Applied Sports Psychology , Blog , Elite Athletes

Sport Psychology and the Olympics 

By Jack Singer, Ph.D.
Licensed and Certified Clinical/Sport Psychologist

Sport Psychology and the Olympics by Dr. Jack SingerIt seems like every time the Olympics roll around the burgeoning field of “Sport Psychology” gets the recognition it deserves, because most of our teams employ sport psychologists to prepare the team and each athlete and work with them throughout the Games.

This summer is no exception.  In the last 20 years, the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) has increased the number of full-time sport psychologists from one to six.  In addition to these full-time psychologists, each team and many individual athletes use consulting sport psychologists to help them with such techniques as imagery, visualization, mental toughness, relaxation, positive self-talk and many other interventions.

Beginning two to four years before the Olympics, USOC sport psychologists spend approximately 100 days a year on the road with the athletes, taking them through their training camps and matches leading up to the Games.

Senior sport psychologist Sean McAnn works with both teams and individuals, with emphases on such skills as maintaining their focus, enhancing their performance, raising their self-confidence and communications skills with teammates and coaches.

Any team sport magnifies potential issues, such as the different personalities of teammates, ego issues and individuals used to always being on top,  and the dynamics of individual champions now pulling together for the sake of the entire team.

The key roles of sport psychologists have taken on more and more importance in the development of both individual and team sports.  And the skill sets these professionals bring to the athletes are critical determinants in their ultimate success.

Free 20 Minute Telephone Consultation with Psychologist Dr. Jack Singer

Dr. Jack Singer’s Professional Biography

Dr. Jack Singer is a licensed Clinical, Sports and Industrial/Organizational Psychologist, author, trainer and consultant. His expertise includes a Doctorate in Industrial / Organizational Psychology and a Post-Doctorate in Clinical / Sports Psychology. Jack has been recognized with Diplomates from the American Academy of Behavioral Medicine, the Society of Police and Criminal Psychology, and he has been awarded with a special Diplomate in Sports Psychology from the National Institute of Sports Professionals. He has a special Certification in Clinical Hypnosis from the American Academy of Clinical Hypnosis and Jack has taught in the Psychology departments of seven universities, including four years as an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the U.S. Air Force Academy.

Dr. Jack Singer has been in private practice and consulting for 33 years and the rich variety of Dr. Jack’s experience ranges from training serious athletes and teams to consistently reach peak performance levels…to working with couples and families to resolve relationship issues .to designing teambuilding ‘re-TREATS’ for Fortune 1000 corporations, and large legal and medical practices. His goal is to provide all of his clients with a SAFE, CONFIDENTIAL, and OPTIMISTIC environment in which to help them resolve their difficulties and reach their goals! In short, his passion is to help them to add life to their years and years to their lives!

 

 

Apr 30

Youth and Sports: What Does Love Have to Do With It?

By Dr. Jack Singer | Applied Sports Psychology , Blog , Children and Family

By Jack Singer, Ph.D.
Certified Sport Psychologist

Youth and Sports by Sports Psychologist Dr. Jack SingerSo much anecdotal evidence exists today of the impact that coaches and the “climate” in which they teach their young charges have on the performance and development of these youngsters. We have all heard of coaches who coach by fear, intimidation and the threat to bench a player. Believe me, in my 33 years of practice as a Professional Sport Psychologist, I have seen the unbelievable damage that such coaching causes on the self-esteem and confidence of young athletes. It’s the rare coach who takes the time to understand each athlete and treat her/him with respect and concern for the greater goal, rather than for whether they win.

Now, there is a wonderful study of exactly what characteristics lead to the best outcomes for youngsters who engage in sporting activities. As reported in the latest issue of “Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology,” the purpose of the study was to examine if the influence of youngsters’ perceptions of a “caring climate” in a summer sport camp program would predict psychological well being of those youngsters throughout their sports camp experience.

The results were amazing! Youngsters who perceived that their counselors/coaches truly cared about them (that is, they felt valued, supported, and accepted, (as opposed to judged or criticized) were much happier and much more coachable. These youngsters maintained hope in the face of failure, and remained happy, rather than sad or depressed. “Results suggest that equipping adults with strategies to create a positive and caring climate can reap significant rewards for young people with regard to their overall physical and psychological development.”

This proves the adage that a “sandwich” approach to coaching youngsters works wonders: Find something good to say about his/her performance, then give feedback about how she/he can improve, and finish it off with something else that is positive. this is the essence of providing a positive and caring climate in which youngsters can learn their sport. And that’s the winning ticket!

Free 20 Minute Telephone Consultation with Psychologist Dr. Jack Singer

 

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