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Sep 23

3 Action Plans for Championship Sales

By Dr. Jack Singer | Blog , Sales Professionals

By Jack Singer, Ph.D.

Why is it that some salespeople with the most talent are often not the most successful?  What gets in their way?  How can some sales people with less natural talent over-achieve and reach much more sales success than their more talented colleagues?  

Are there specific mental skills that can lead anyone toward championship levels of sales performance?  What separates the mindset of a champion from that of the also-rans? 

Traditional sales training programs ignore the biggest obstacles to success.  Instead, they focus on specific sales and closing techniques.  But the biggest obstacles are not sales talent, motivation or knowledge of techniques. The biggest obstacles, like those overcome by champion athletes, are the internal, mental and emotional barriers that sales professionals face on a daily basis.. 

Below are three powerful components of the mindset of a champion.  Put them into action today and watch your sales performance skyrocket! 

Take Charge of Your Internal Dialogue: Engage the linguistic nutrition of championship performance

Your self-talk is the foundation of your belief system and your belief system determines your attitudes about your success or lack of it in your sales career.  Inner thoughts either set you up for success or failure.  So often, people unconsciously use self-limiting thoughts which prevent them from being successful. It’s a form of unintended self-sabotage.  

Examples of such self-talk phrases, are:  “The economy will make this a tough sell now” or   “I’ll be lucky if I make half the sales I made last year.”  These kinds of thoughts are like eating junk food once you decide that a healthy eating lifestyle is just too difficult to maintain. Your thoughts set you up for failure. 

Your thoughts determine your beliefs and your beliefs develop your attitudes, which determine your behaviors and actions.  Therefore, negative, pessimistic thoughts will ultimately lead to procrastination and poor sales outcomes.  Such thoughts actually convince your mind that you will fail. 

Action Plan 1:

Keep a written journal of negative thoughts that enter your mind regarding your sales performance and notice the patterns.  Then, use rational thinking to counterpunch each negative thought with a healthy, positive thought.  Example:  Change “This economy will drive my customers away now.” to “I don’t have to be successful with every client.  This is a numbers game. I am a sharp, creative person and I’ll find new markets/customers for my product, despite the economy.  I’ll keep my eyes open for opportunities, which I really believe will present themselves.”

Unleash the Power of Your Mind:  Plow through the mental road blocks to championship performance 

Your subconscious mind takes orders from you without judging success or failure. You always have the choice in what you feed to your subconscious mind. Therefore, you must believe in yourself and in the value of the products you are selling.  Eliminate “imposter fears,” which are the belief that you really are not good at what you do or your products are really not as valuable to potential customers as you propose they are.

So often, salespeople focus on their failures and what they did not achieve.  Instead, you need to focus on what you have achieved. You can actually program your mind to believe in your strengths and your ultimate success. 

Just as athletes focus on their strengths, you can focus on yours.  Always remember that your product knowledge, your customer service skills and your sincere concern that the customer is satisfied and better off having purchased your products or services will overcome any deficiencies you see in yourself.

Action Plan 2:  Practice presenting a positive attitude toward everyone you meet, not just prospective clients and customers. Constantly pat yourself on the back with positive self-talk, such as, “I provide a valuable service to my clients” and “I help people achieve their goals.” 

Focus on good results you have achieved in your sales career and pat yourself on the back.  Learn from results you were not pleased with in the past and move on.  Keep a SUCCESS JOURNAL.  Record times you were on a roll and situations where you were really proud of what you accomplished.  Each day put at least one item on your list.  Review the list of successes regularly, especially when you are having a worrisome day. 

Fill Your Mind with Optimistic Expectations: Unleash the most powerful mental tool that drives championship performance

Research conducted over 30 years with over one million participants has determined that there is a single, powerful predictor of sales achievement—optimistic expectations. 

Ability and motivation in ones’ sales career are not always enough to guarantee consistent results. Expectations of success or failure are self-fulfilling prophecies that often determine the outcomes, regardless of ability and motivation.  The research also shows that people who develop learned optimism live longer and healthier lives, so there are major benefits that go far beyond your career. 

The key here is to believe that you will succeed, despite the challenges, obstacles and setbacks that are inevitable in your sales career. Continue to believe you will succeed, even in the face of resistance, rejection and hostility.  How you explain to yourself and react to setbacks in your sales career is a crucial determinant of how successful you will ultimately be.  Training yourself to look at setbacks as temporary challenges and minimizing those setbacks with the knowledge that you can find a solution and overcome them, predicts ultimate success.  

Action Plan 3:  Developing optimistic expectations can be learned!  Even if you are a chronic pessimist and your parents or spouse is a pessimistic thinker, you can absolutely learn ways to overcome the negative beliefs that underlie your pessimistic explanatory style.  Revisit Action Plan 1 (above) because the best way to develop an optimistic explanatory style is by understanding your own negative thinking patterns and practicing changing them.  You can also get cognitive training from a professional psychologist or by attending training seminars directed at teaching you learned optimism.  Such training will do wonders for your career and in your life!

Dr. Jack Singer is a professional speaker, trainer and licensed psychologist. He has been speaking for and training Fortune 1000 companies, associations, CEO’s, sales forces  and elite athletes for 34 years.  Dr. Jack is a frequent guest on CNN, MSNBC, GLENN BECK, FOX SPORTS and countless radio talk shows across the U.S. and Canada.  He is the author of “The Teacher’s Ultimate Stress Mastery Guide,” and several series of hypnotic audio programs– some specifically for athletes and others for anyone wanting to raise their self-confidence, self-esteem and optimism. For more information, see: www.drjacksinger.com 

Aug 10

Hire Dr. Jack Singer For Your Next Keynote

By Dr. Jack Singer | Motivational Speaker

Dr. Jack Singer, the "Fun Speaker"How Meeting Planners can make sure that their business meetings and events are infused with fun and excitement.

People attend meetings and conferences for all kinds of reasons.  Some go because they are required to.  Some are obviously looking for knowledge and inspiration.  Some want to “recharge their batteries” and need a break from the daily grind.  Some are looking for camaraderie with others who share their frustrations.  Regardless of the particular motivation, your goal is to provide a fresh, innovative and entertaining program that will make a real difference in the work and lives of the attendees. 

By hiring the right keynote speaker your audience will be riveted, educated, energized, inspired, motivated and wanting more.

A wealth of research shows that providing a fun atmosphere promotes attention to and retention of the information provided, as well as encourages dialogue and interaction throughout the meeting. A fun milieu promotes a safe and relaxed feeling for even the most reticent attendee.

Every event is made up of four critical components and here are key tips the meeting professional can use to bring fun, anticipation and excitement to each phase. 

Setting the Tone Even Before the Meeting Takes Place 

  • Announce in the advertising and registration materials that there will be prizes awarded for completing a fun crossword puzzle (containing key information about the association, company, etc.) included in the mailing. 
  • For smaller audiences, ask attendees to bring pictures of themselves as babies (or their yearbook picture).  They will be posted around the meeting room and prizes will be given to those who correctly match the most faces.   
  • Announce that a team scavenger hunt will be part of the event.

 Obviously, there is no limit to the ideas you can use and the message everyone gets is “this is going to be a different, fun meeting.”

Opening Your Fun Event 

  • Have upbeat music playing while attendees are entering the meeting.  Music sets a vibrant tone and puts attendees at ease.  It can also be used to accompany interactive games, breaks and at the closing. Copyright infringement can be avoided by selecting “copyright fee paid” CD’s, all commercially available. 
  • A short, humorous video can open your event by setting the expectation that this meeting will be fun and unique.  Video segments can also be strategically inserted throughout the event to avoid boredom and during breaks. The internet provides tons of funny commercials and short videos suitable for any audience. Commercially available videos, such as Jerry Seinfeld’s final stand-up routine, are easily accessible and loads of fun. 
  • Select a keynoter who will greet the attendees at the door, let them feel welcomed and present from the front of a stage or close to the first row of seats.  This way, the attendees get a sense of comfort with the speaker, rather than feel distant from the speaker who  “talks down” to them from a podium. 
  • Dynamic ice breakers serve multiple purposes.  Interactive ice breakers facilitate networking and prepare attendees for a creative and meaningful learning experience.  There are many catalogs of ice breakers available.  An example is the human treasure hunt, which I use with every group I speak for. Attendees are provided with a list of traits, such as “enjoys eating liver,” or “has found a successful way to bring fun to his/her workplace.” Attendees have 10 minutes to fill their sheet. The first to finish wins a prize. This serves as a fabulous networking instrument, as well. 

Energizing Your Event 

Well spaced energizing games throughout the meat of the event prevent fatigue, boredom and passivity. 

  • A “stress buster” kit can be given to all attendees upon arrival and various toys from the box can be used throughout the meeting.  For example, nurf ball games with teams can be a fun way to develop group dynamics concepts. Have plenty of fun prizes available, such as clown noses, goofy glasses, squeeze toys, etc. 
  • Ask for volunteers to discuss the funniest/most embarrassing experiences they ever had.  This hilarious break can be used to emphasize a point that the speaker is making; for example, how to use humor to counteract stress. 
  • Fun prizes can be given to audience members throughout the presentation for answering (or asking) key questions. 
  • Many team exercises are available for various sized groups, including improve games, stress-busting games, communications skills teams, etc.  The exercises are not only fun, but they are directed toward the specific goals of the meeting. 

Memorable Closers 

Other than the introduction, the closing is the most important part of the meeting, in terms of riveting the information in the minds of the attendees. 

  • Form an action plan, with attendees teaming up with a partner to share ideas they learned and that they plan to incorporate into their work/lives.  Set a date for the partners to call each other to check up on the progress of implementing those changes. 
  • For small groups, have a “brag bag” exercise where each attendee writes something positive about each other attendee and they all put their slips with comments into bags labeled  the names of attendees.  Each attendee takes home the bag with all of these positive comments included. 
  • End with another fun exercise so the last thing attendees do is laugh and leave on a high note.

For additional program information, availability or pricing, please call toll free 1-800-497-9880 or use our contact form here.

The Fun Speaker Keynotes and Programs

Dr. Jack Singer, “The Fun Speaker” Client Roster

Written Testimonials by Dr. Jack Singer’s Speaking Clients

**You have permission to reprint in your publication or to your website/blog any articles by Dr.Jack Singer found on this Website as long as Dr. Jack Singer’s name and contact information is included. Jack Singer, Ph.D., Licensed Clinical Pyschologist, Sport Psychologist, Marriage, Family & Relationship Therapist, Professional Motivational Speaker. http://dr.jacksinger.com, toll free 800-497-9880.